INCSpot

INCSpot

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Tuesday, June 23, 2015

While the new approach the state has adopted to track low-income student enrollment does not change the share of the state’s low-income students served by Gateway City districts in the aggregate, it does lead to some significant changes between these urban district. On average, those with higher levels of English Language Learners tend to lose share. The greatest decreases are in Revere, Everett, Brockton, Lynn, and Chelsea.

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Monday, June 22, 2015

Since Massachusetts passed education reform in 1993, theshare of Gateway City students who are low-income has risen from less than halfto two-thirds. This concentration of poverty in Gateway City school districtsmeans nearly every student in these urban centers now attends a school wheremore than 40 percent of the students are poor—a threshold social scientists suggesthas negative repercussions.

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Friday, June 12, 2015

Tuesday's State House hearing on mandatory minimums showed signs of the beginning of a robust dialogue at the state legislative level on comprehensive criminal justice reform.

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Thursday, June 11, 2015

As the debate on repealing mandatory minimums unfolds, a key question is how do residents in communities most impacted by crime feel about a change in course? To gain this perspective, MassINC’s2014 poll included a sample of 10 communities representing half of all releases from state prisons. Residents in these high-release areas were more likely to favor full judicial discretion in sentencing (51 percent vs 39 percent in all other areas); fewer than one in 10 supported mandatory minimum sentences. 

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Wednesday, June 10, 2015

Recent focus on corrections reform has drawn attention to the state’s relatively low incarceration rate. In national data, Massachusetts’s incarceration rate appears slightly low because more offenders are held in county jails and fewer are held in state prison facilities. Adjusting for this policy is difficult. The federal government has not released  state jail population estimates since 2006

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Friday, April 17, 2015

The  Building on What Works Coalition   released a  white paper   this week that looks at creative new ways to invest in the learning models of the future. As leaders on Beacon Hill solidify budget priorities for the next fiscal year, the paper explores near-term steps that could be taken in the FY 2016 budget to pave the way toward the next phase of education reform in the Commonwealth.

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Wednesday, April 1, 2015
The Governor’s Budget includes a plan to double the state’s EITC from 15 to 30 percent of the federal. Gateway Cities would disproportionately benefit from this change.
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Friday, March 20, 2015
First in a series of three blogs on the state’s changing regional economies

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